The World’s Most Expensive Cars « KYMX.com ? Home of 96.1 Mix 96

I just came across an awesome post by marilyn nelson, posted earlier today, over on KYMX.com – Home of 96.1 Mix 96 entitled The World's Most Expensive Cars « KYMX.com ? Home of 96.1 Mix 96 that I strongly suggest everyone reads. Here are a few little extracts in the hope of piquing your interest!

The car once driven by Sean Connery in “Goldfinger” and “Thunderball” is set to go to the highest bidder today.  James Bond’s silver 1964 Aston Martin is one of more than 100 vehicles for sale at the annual “Automobiles of London” event.  The model comes equipped with all the gadgets featured in the movie including machine guns, bullet-proof shield, revolving number plates, tracking device, removable roof panel, oil slick sprayer, nail spreader and smoke screen.  Bond’s 007 car is expected to fetch up to $12 million. .

Now then, reading marilyn nelson’s post started me off thinking so I did a quick search for some other articles on the subject and uncovered some more greatposts. e.g. this post posted earlier today, by Stuart Smith, on Alexander Higgins Blog:

It really is fairly startling, considering how sophisticated the industry has become. And the inspectors themselves are quite aware of their needs.” Cementing and centralizers have become important issues in the Deepwater Horizon investigation. The failure of cement seals in BP’s well apparently let in gas, which blew out the top of the well and destroyed the rig. Marine Board investigators also have focused on BP’s decisions to save time and money with fewer centralizers, which would have reduced the risk of gas flowing into the well bore.

Another fine post came from unknown on oilspillaction.com posted earlier today, entitled Drilling rig inspectors had vast gaps in knowledge, oil spill … which is also definitely worth a read!

“All they get is on-the-job training. It really is fairly startling, considering how sophisticated the industry has become. And the inspectors themselves are quite aware of their needs.” Cementing and centralizers have become important issues in the Deepwater Horizon investigation. The failure of cement seals in BP’s well apparently let in gas, which blew out the top of the well and destroyed the rig.

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“BOEMRE currently does not have a formal training and certification program for its inspectors, but up until this point has relied upon on-the-job training from more experienced inspectors,” Bromwich said. “One of the things that we are looking at implementing is a strong bureau-wide certification or accreditation program for inspectors to ensure that our inspectors are given the proper fundamental knowledge and maintain proficiency with current systems and operations.” Findings due Nov. 8 That training plan is significant for the Oil Spill Commission, appointed by Obama on May 21. The commission is planning to report its findings on what went wrong on the Deepwater Horizon at hearings Nov. 8. Members took special interest in a report by the Interior Department’s Safety Oversight Board in September, which recommended that inspectors should be on rigs to observe critical operations first-hand “to the greatest extent practicable.” Such on-site viewing was never part of the rig inspector’s job under the now-dissolved Minerals Management Service. Instead, MMS engineers would approve or reject permits for certain key drilling activities and review weekly printed reports from the rig to make sure the operator was complying with regulations.

 [...]

New safety rules imposed by BOEMRE last month are the first to require federal engineers to review cementing plans to ensure they follow best industry practices. Under MMS, there were no federal regulations governing specific cementing procedures. Federal regulations did require MMS to approve major changes to well design and equipment and to check for certain tests and certifications of well-control equipment, such as blowout preventers. Inspectors announced visits The effectiveness of those existing rules was called into question when Frank Patton, the MMS official who approved the Deepwater Horizon drilling permits, testified before an accident investigation panel in May that he wasn’t aware of some of those critical blowout preventer requirements. The Deepwater Horizon’s blowout preventer, which sat on the well head 5,000 feet under the sea, didn’t work properly the night of April 20 and failed to close off the gushing well.

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